Restaurant Development & Design

WINTER 2014

restaurant development + design is a user-driven resource for restaurant professionals charged with building new locations and remodeling existing units.

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4 6 • R E S T A U R A N T D E V E L O P M E N T + D E S I G N • W I N T E R 2 0 1 4 healthy foods prepared especially for the customer. It becomes a restaurant cam- oufaged as a market and vice versa." A Consumer Shift Eataly's architects have designed each of the chain's 28 locations to refect a rich heritage of food. The company was launched in Turin, Italy, by founder Oscar Farinetti in an effort to encour- age the slow food movement. Eataly's breakdown of shoppers compared to diners is almost an even 50/50 split, with its customers spanning almost every social stratum. "There is a lot of education behind Eataly, but it's a slow process because it's a change in attitude and in people's mentality," Sleeper says. "So, when you walk into Eataly, you're bombarded with colors and people and movement and communication. We like to talk about our producers and where they come from, so education is huge for us." While concepts such as Eataly con- tinue to reshape the grocery experience for urbanites in cities like New York and Chicago, they won't work everywhere. But their popularity conveys the message to grocers that they can successfully expand their horizons. "People have decided, after shopping around, that the supermarket is the best place for getting food," says Lempert. "They're trying again to be the center of the community and everything that community needs." "Because of the shift in social trends, along with a highly competitive market temperament, supermarkets have slowly recognized that their direct competition is not the other supermarket, but the restau- rant down the street," Giammarco says. "As consumers, we are beneftting from this continually evolving food offering." + DESIGNS ON DINING Eataly opened its second U.S. location, a 50,000-square-foot facility in Chicago that offers prepared versions of the food it sells.

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