Restaurant Development & Design

MAY-JUN 2017

restaurant development + design is a user-driven resource for restaurant professionals charged with building new locations and remodeling existing units.

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M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 7 • r e s t a u r a n t d e v e l o p m e n t + d e s i g n • 1 9 looking for locations in the 2,000- to 2,500-square-foot range. All of the units feature open kitch- ens that comprise roughly one-third of the total footprint. "We believe the kitchen is the heart of it all, so we've pulled that forward and opened it up," Chissler says. "From the rounded counter, you can look back in and see fresh biscuits being made, coffee being made, sandwiches being assembled. It's designed to show off the food." Holler & Dash takes a chef-driven approach to menu development and ingredient sourcing. The initial menu was created in collaboration with noted Nashville chef Jason McConnell. Starting with the biscuits, he helped to refine reci- pes and create the concept's signature multilayered flavor profiles. Items like the Kickback Chicken sandwich, which pairs fried chicken with creamy goat cheese, scallions and spicy-sweet pepper jelly on a fresh biscuit, highlight McConnell's approach to creating craveable combina- tions. Other popular selections include the Pork Rambler, with fried pork tender- loin, blackberry butter and onion straws, and the Hollerback Club, with bacon, guacamole, fried green tomatoes and Hol- lerback sauce. Brandon Frohne serves as director of culinary. Along with McConnell, he has further refined the menu and put a strong focus on sourcing premium local and regional products. "Jason and Brandon are commit- ted to making sure we have the best products and that we source from local and regional partners who share our culture," Chissler says. "Having them on board has helped us leverage local supply chains and also gives us credibility within the marketplace that there is a strong culinary program behind this brand." Pine State Biscuits HQ: Portland, Ore. Ownership: Kevin Atchley, Walt Alexander, Brian Snyder Units: three, plus farmers market stand Hours: 7 a.m.-3 p.m. daily Unit size: 600-1,000 square feet Average check: $12-$15 with no alcohol; $18-$21 with alcohol Best seller: the Reggie biscuit sandwich with fried chicken, bacon, cheese, gravy Launched in 2006 as a farmers market stand, Pine State Biscuits has become a Portland favorite and grand dame of the biscuit-house phenomenon in the Pacific Northwest. The brainchild of three North Carolina transplants, Pine Street has grown to three brick-and-mortar loca- tions in addition to its original farmers market presence. A fourth restaurant is expected to open later this year. Kevin Atchley, who started the company with college friends Walt Alexander and Brian Snyder, says the concept is based on traditional rural Southern biscuit kitchens that the trio frequented as kids. "Many of them operated 24 hours a day, and they were always swarming with people. The biscuits were handmade, fresh and hot," he says. "We took that basic theme and updated it with what we felt would suit the urban Portland mar- ket. We focused on using the types of ingredients and flavors that we prefer to eat and on sourcing relatively healthy, natural local products. I might be run out of town in North Carolina for this, but we dismissed the idea of using lard Holler & Dash is a unique fast-casual concept built around biscuit sandwiches and offering a modern twist on Southern hospitality. Photo by Erika Chambers

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