Restaurant Development & Design

September-October 2017

restaurant development + design is a user-driven resource for restaurant professionals charged with building new locations and remodeling existing units.

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"We were trying to create a rustic- modern combination of materials and a vibe that taps into Houston's laid-back Southern vibe but also plays to its polished, contemporary energy," Schiller says. Repositioning "All-Day" Dining While new chef-driven concepts and local appeal are changing the game, hotels still need to cater to a broad spectrum of travelers and provide options for guests throughout the day. That often means integrating an all-day dining venue — but even those are being packaged in more sophisticated ways. In some respects, it's back to semantics: Hoteliers are dropping the terms "all-day dining" or "three-meal restaurant" as descriptors. Marriott's Scott says it's all about perception and position- ing, with "all-day dining" often setting expectations for mediocracy. "We're trying to get away from the formula-concept three-meal-a-day restaurant," he says. "With the amount of families and business travelers we serve, there's still a need for those operations, but by getting more creative and strategic, we're steering clear of the negative connotations sometimes associated with them." At the Fairmont Quasar Istanbul, which opened earlier this year, Kwan and his team created two distinct dining venues. One is an upscale specialty restaurant called Aila; he describes the design as "flamboyant, sexy, curvilinear, and layered with Turkish patterns and tex- tures." Signature features include a spice library curated from Istanbul's famed Spice Bazaar (guests can purchase spices from the restaurant, too), a bar and a traditional Turkish grill. The other venue is Stations, an all-day buffet with an elevated design, multiple seating areas and an artisanal bent. "Stations was a bit of a challenge because it's a buffet concept. Everyone hates buffet lines, but all of the food in this operation is very well curated and cooked in small batches, much of it at live cooking stations in front of guests," says Kwan. "Its menu celebrates Turkish and other inter- national cuisines, and its aesthetic was inspired by the history of the building." The Fairmont occupies a Robert Millet-Stevens-designed building that was one of the first liquor factories in Turkey. For Stations, the Wilson team blended Millet-Stevens' characteristic industrial and art deco influences with cues taken from prohibition. All the artwork in the restaurant, for example, depicts scenes of artisan liquor production and is themati- cally relevant to the type of authentic, craft cooking that Stations employs. Kwan says the Stations concept, with its polished design, hyper-local influences and live cooking platforms, is reflective of where the industry is headed — namely, toward creating experiences that engage and excite guests in ways that most hotel restaurants historically have not. + SCULPTED PETALS + OIL RUBBED BRONZE THE FORMULA FREE MIRROFLEX SAMPLE KIT! Contact an ATI Customer Service Representative at 800.849.1320 to place your order. Promo Code: MirroFlexKit17 Off er Expires: 11/30/2017 SCULPTED PETALS + OIL RUBBED BRONZE SCULPTED PETALS + OIL RUBBED BRONZE SCULPTED PETALS + OIL RUBBED BRONZE THE FORMULA THE FORMULA FREE MIRROFLEX SAMPLE KIT! Contact an ATI Customer Service Representative at 800.849.1320 to place your order. Promo Code: MirroFlexKit17 Off er Expires: 11/30/2017 The first floor of The Watermark Hotel is one large public area that flows from lobby to bar to restaurant. From the entry vestibule, guests have sightlines through the entire space to a dramatic curtain lining the restaurant's back wall. Photo by Andrew Bordwin

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