Restaurant Development & Design

SEP-OCT 2018

restaurant development + design is a user-driven resource for restaurant professionals charged with building new locations and remodeling existing units.

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6 0 • r e s t a u r a n t d e v e l o p m e n t + d e s i g n • S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 VIBRANT VIDRIO Mediterranean home. "There's no audio; just visual," Gold- faden says. "It's very serene and calm and helps transport you to a Mediterra- nean mindset when you're sitting there. Sometimes it's something a little more abstract, like ink slowly swirling in water. So there's an artistic statement to it that helps bring you back to the amazing architecture and art that surrounds you." "We wanted dramatic scale in the dining room but also elements of past, present and future," Bakatsias adds. "The slow-motion visual element, projected onto very large screens, was crucial. It's modern and adds move- ment, and it's another way we played with scale to create a multidimen- sional space." Multidimensionality also comes into play in Vidrio's main bar area, the design of which allows it to serve as a cozier and more intimate space. A freestanding double-sided bar topped in polished wal- nut showcases one of the restaurant's big draws — an award-winning wine program that features 48 selections on tap, as well as hundreds of bottled wines. As in rooms throughout the restau- rant, creative ceiling treatments crafted from simple, natural wood add artistic and sculptural elements to the bar area. Above the bar, for instance, thousands of dowels hang vertically, taking the place of a traditional soffit. Pin lights shine down through the dowels, illuminating the bar and creating shadow play that implies subtle movement. "It helps to bring the ceiling down and add some intimacy to the space while still maintaining the scale. It's also intriguing and fun," Bakatsias says. "And because it's made from wood, it again incorporates earthiness but does so in a way that's very artful and modern." Positioned along the street side, Vidrio's bar also offers an indoor-outdoor experience. When weather permits, large custom guillotine windows slide open to the vibrant street scene outside and to the restaurant's front garden. Goldfaden notes that the entire Vid- rio experience strives to convey vibrancy. "Whenever we design a restaurant, we begin with what we call a filter word," she says. "For Vidrio, that word was 'vibrant.' Every decision we made hinged on whether or not the material or design ap- proach in question had the vibrancy that we wanted Vidrio to portray. Starting with the wall, all of these various elements work together toward that goal." + UP UP UP Mezzanine Dining Lounge Corridor Men Women Banquet Banquet Kitchen Bar Elev Lobby Suite Suite Bathroom Snapshot Project: Vidrio Location: Raleigh, N.C. Ownership: LM Restaurants Project type: New construction Concept: Polished casual Mediterranean restaurant and private event space Size: 17,000 square feet; two levels Average check: $35 Build-out: 18 months Design highlights: Two-story art-glass wall evoking sunset over the Mediter- ranean Sea, rope chandeliers, elevat- ed dining area with video art feature walls, midcentury modern furnishings, artistic wood ceiling treatments, Medi- terranean tiles, open kitchen

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