Restaurant Development & Design

FALL 2014

restaurant development + design is a user-driven resource for restaurant professionals charged with building new locations and remodeling existing units.

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F A L L 2 0 1 4 • R E S T A U R A N T D E V E L O P M E N T + D E S I G N • 4 3 "The space was designed to try to connect people visually and emo- tionally with the farm," says Danielle Harrity, director of events for Blue Hill. The restaurant hosts large events in its Hay Loft, a wide-open barn, but groups of up to 14 guests can host dinners, luncheons and cocktail receptions in a smaller dining area that straddles the main dining room and a cobblestone foyer leading to a patio. Large, foor-to-ceiling windows in this 500-square-foot space overlook a small herb and vegetable garden just outside, as well as the rolling felds and pastures beyond. As Blue Hill at Stone Barns' menus have evolved, so has the use of this space. Now smaller, more intimate parties can join together to enjoy the restaurant's "grazing, pecking, rooting menu," Harrity says, adding that Blue Hill is known for its elaborate, multicourse meals marked by extreme creativity, precision and beautiful presentations. Limestone foors and architectural details were designed to keep the visual fow from the patio grounds to the neutral- toned private dining room. The minimalist decor — which also includes reclaimed wood and texturized, Venetian plas- tered walls in beige and other neutral colors — was purpose- ful. Says Harrity, "Instead of being heavy handed in any way, we wanted to let the farm be the centerpiece with its beautifully colored fowers and herbs and vegetables." The understated decor and natural light also help put the focus on the food and create a sense of antiquity and authenticity. While windows draw in plenty of light during the day, just a few foor lamps and recessed lighting throughout the arched ceilings provide warm light during the evening. Some lighting was placed throughout the terrace and herb garden to create a "magical and quiet" feel and highlight the farm at night. + 7 out of 10 patrons agreed in a YouGov survey that a wobbly table would give them a negative impression of a restaurant. FLAT table bases stabilize on uneven foors. Instantly. They also enable seamless alignment of tabletops. Design creatively, with the fexibility and upscale appeal of a freestanding table. DON'T 855-999-3528 www.fattech.com/usa/request-sample REQUEST A FLAT TECH SAMPLE TODAY! GET MAD. GET EVEN . WITH FLAT ® TECH SELF-STABILIZING TABLE BASES The 14-seat Garden Room at the farm-to- table Blue Hill at Stone Barns restaurant features foor-to-ceiling windows overlooking a small herb and vegetable garden, and rolling felds and pastures beyond. WELL-DESIGNED, TECH-ENABLED SPACES BUILD PRIVATE DINING BUSINESS

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